Journal Information
Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-WCM.html
Impact Factor:
0.922
Publisher:
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN:
1530-8669
Viewed:
4869
Tracked:
9

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Call For Papers
Presenting comprehensive coverage of this fast moving field, Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing provides the R&D communities working in academia and the telecommunications and networking industries with a forum for sharing research and ideas.

The convergence of wireless communications and mobile computing is bringing together two areas of immense growth and innovation. This is reflected throughout the journal by strongly focusing on new trends, developments, emerging technologies and new industrial standards.

Under the guidance of an international editorial and advisory board drawn from academia and industry, this high quality, peer-reviewed journal, provides leading edge coverage of the opportunities and challenges driving the research and development of mobile communication systems.

All you need to stay ahead ...

    High calibre survey papers
    Written by leading experts in the wireless and networking communities.
    Rapid publication times
    Due to electronic review and submission of original research papers
    Special Issues
    Addressing key topics of interest and managed by high profile editors
    An international forum for the sharing of research and ideas
    Key topics presented by leading individuals at the cutting edge of new technologies. 
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issues
Special Issue on Real-Time Communication in Wireless Sensor Networks
Submission Date: 2017-06-09

Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have opened up many new possibilities to utilize useful environmental information. For instance, event information around sensor nodes can potentially be acquired through multihop communications. Unfortunately, most of the important metrics of sensing values are very sensitive to delay or latency. In fact, real-time applications are performance critical applications that require bounded service latency. In multihop wireless ad hoc and sensor networks, communication delays are dominant over processing delays. Therefore, to enable real-time applications in such networks, the communication latency must be bounded. Hence, it is strongly recommended to deliver data to sink nodes within some specified “deadlines” in order to maintain the validity of transmitted data. However, due to limited computing power and narrow bandwidth, it is often difficult to provide real-time communication in WSNs. This special issue solicits the submission of high-quality and unpublished papers that aim to solve open technical problems and challenges typical of real-time communication in WSNs, integrating novel solutions efficiently, and focusing on the performance evaluation and comparison with existing standards. Both theoretical and experimental studies for typical real-time communication scenarios are encouraged. Furthermore, also high-quality research and review papers are welcomed. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Real-time traffic model in WSNs Communication in Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) MAC, routing, and transport-layer protocols for real-time communications in WSNs Scheduling algorithms for real-time communication in WSNs Networks architecture for real-time communication in WSNs Performance evaluation of real-time communication in WSNs Applications of real-time communication in WSNs Topological control of real-time communication in WSNs Real-time communication for the Internet of Things (IoT) Soft computing approaches as a support for real-time communication in WSNs Impact on power consumption of real-time communication in WSNs Impact of wireless backhaul connections on the performance of real time WSN systems Testbed for real-time WSNs Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/rtcw/. Manuscript Due Friday, 9 June 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 1 September 2017 Publication Date Friday, 27 October 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Internet of Things and Smart Environments Supporting Healthy Ageing Services
Submission Date: 2017-06-23

The Internet of Things (IoT) is playing a role more and more important in the daily life of everybody. The opportunity to have smart objects anywhere, as a network of billions or trillions of sensor nodes connected to the Internet, represents a fundamental feature of the digital world to create a better world for human beings, where objects around us know what we like, what we want, and what we need and act accordingly without explicit instructions. The opportunity to implement pervasive environments that are able to detect environmental human behaviour parameters is becoming more attractive for both the academic and the industrial world in many scenarios such as environmental monitoring, building automation, healthcare, smart cities, smart grid, and logistics. Among these, the healthcare sector focused on elderly people is certainly a very challenging topic taking into account the growing average age of the population and the rise of over 75-year-old people worldwide. Innovative solutions able to support and improve the elderly people’ quality of life exploiting emerging technologies enabling the IoT are fundamentals to create the new smart cities, thought also for people not so young. Furthermore, the behavioural analysis of elderly people is an important science aiming to prevent Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and frailty problems. A fundamental aspect in this context is to explore the use of innovative technologies enabling the Internet of Things (IoT), above all sensors, to unobtrusively capture personal data for automatically recognizing behavioural changes in elderly people. In this special issue, articles regarding the use of technologies, methodologies, and applications for elderly friendly cities and healthy ageing services are invited. Authors are encouraged to submit articles mainly describing original research, presenting results that advance the state of the art and fuel more efforts in the future. Review articles are also welcome. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Ubiquitous sensing and actuation Mobile applications for monitoring and assisting the elderly IoT architectures, protocols, and algorithms in smart cities Innovative solutions for capturing elderly people’s data Big Data for behaviour changes analysis RFID and WSN technologies for smart environments Innovative AAL systems Remote assistance services Smart solutions to reduce frailty and MCI risks Case studies, field trials, and research projects on elderly friendly smart cities Impact evaluation of IoT-aware technologies on elderly healthcare system Geriatric and medical evaluation of emerging IoT-aware technologies Trends and challenges in elderly friendly smart cities and healthy ageing services Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/itse/. Manuscript Due Friday, 23 June 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 15 September 2017 Publication Date Friday, 10 November 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Learning Algorithms for Wireless Networks
Submission Date: 2017-06-30

Machine learning (ML) is an active area of research that is becoming increasingly relevant in multiple fields. This popularity is motivated, in part, by the increasing computational capabilities that make possible the analysis of large amounts of data. ML provides algorithms for extracting knowledge from these data, allowing us to solve multiple problems in complex systems that cannot be easily modeled. Among these, wireless networks are especially complex systems with multiple interactions between algorithms from the protocol layers and between the devices themselves, with the added complexity of hardware specific influences and the inherent complex nature of wireless propagation. Therefore, the data-driven nature of ML techniques can be extremely useful in this area, replacing or complementing classical, model-based approaches in wireless networks research. For this special issue we are looking for original papers presenting novel and innovative applications of ML algorithms in wireless networks such as cellular, local area networks or WSNs. Original research and review papers describing practical implementations and trials in real networks or test-beds are also welcomed. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Novel applications of ML paradigms such as supervised learning, unsupervised learning, reinforcement learning, or online learning Recent advances in deep learning applied to wireless networks Online learning mechanisms for self-configuration, self-optimization, self-protection, or self-healing Distributed learning algorithms in wireless networks Theoretical analyses of ML algorithms in wireless networks, such as convergence results, stability, and complexity Practical aspects such as scalability issues, signaling, and computational and storage overhead Anomaly and fault detection by ML in wireless networks ML for energy saving applications and green wireless networking Architectural aspects and standardization issues of ML functionalities in wireless networks Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/lawn/. Manuscript Due Friday, 30 June 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 22 September 2017 Publication Date Friday, 17 November 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Air Interface Designs for 5G Radio Access Technologies and Beyond
Submission Date: 2017-06-30

Spectrum scarcity has become a major issue for commercial, public safety, and other wireless communication systems. Moreover, the 5G system needs to be more flexible to support the envisioned variety of heterogeneous device and service types. Consequently, air interface design proposals for 5G and beyond are facing a dramatic shift in design requirements in order to support the adverse objectives of different device and service types and to accommodate available spectrum resources and various connectivity options. Thus, air interface design solutions for future 5G and beyond are expected to be tunable; an alternative is a set of use-case/service-specific air interface solutions that will jointly cover the overall requirement space in 5G. For devices, network infrastructure, and chipset manufactures, the latter solution would result in a need to support an increasingly heterogeneous system, which would in turn significantly increase implementation costs and complexity. Therefore, it will be highly important to develop options to harmonize and simplify design characteristics and functionalities to give room for the incoming 5G use cases. This special issue aims at collecting high quality papers containing original research results as well as high quality review articles illustrating the new alternatives for the design of the 5G air interface not limited to the current 3GPP studies for NR access technologies. It also aims at presenting current trends (including 3GPP progress) and specific breakthroughs for certain topics. Of special interest are papers discussing a long-term vision for 5G air interface, how forward compatibility will be ensured, and how the device ecosystem may evolve in the longer term. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Waveforms, alternatives, and their parametrization Modulation and coding schemes Frame structure RAN support for network slicing Massive MIMO support D2D support Multiservice support: V2X support URLLC support IoT/mMTC support Solutions allowing operation in bands below and above 6 GHz Air interface harmonization, that is, approaches to make different air interfaces operate simultaneously in an efficient manner Candidate technologies for discussion in 3GPP NR phase II standardization Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/aido/. Manuscript Due Friday, 30 June 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 22 September 2017 Publication Date Friday, 17 November 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on IntraBody Communication (IBC)
Submission Date: 2017-06-30

IntraBody communication (IBC) is a promising wireless communication technology for the development of body area networks (BANs) and remote and ubiquitous monitoring. IBC uses the human body as a transmission medium, achieving power-saving and miniaturized transceivers, therefore making communications more robust against interferences and immune to attacks on the privacy of transmitted data. Due to these advantages, IBC has been included as a third physical layer in the IEEE 802.15.6 standard for wireless body area networks (WBAN) designated as Human Body Communication (HBC). IBC/HBC encompasses two main methods: capacitive and galvanic coupling. Further research is needed to compare both methods depending on the characteristics of IBC application. Challenges remain for an optimal deployment of IBC technology, such as the effect of long-term use in the human body, communication optimization through more realistic models, the influence of both anthropometric characteristics and the subject’s movement on the transmission performance, standardization of communications, and development of small-size and energy-efficient prototypes with increased data rate. The purpose of this special issue is to publish high-quality research papers as well as review articles which address recent advances in human body/intrabody communication for wireless communications and mobile computing. Original, high-grade contributions that are not yet published or that are not currently under review by other journals/conferences are sought. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Modeling and characterization of capacitive and galvanic coupling Transmission characteristics through the human body Equivalent circuit of IBC channels Measurement issues and experimental characterization IBC for implanted systems Electrodes and antennas for IBC Influence of anthropometric characteristics and position issues Sources of artifacts and noise in IBC Design and implementation of IBC transceivers IBC modulation and access methods Energy efficiency and power consumption IBC in medicine, systems, and applications Nanoscale intrabody communication systems Safety requirements and regulations in IBC Future challenges of IBC Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/icwc/. Manuscript Due Friday, 30 June 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 22 September 2017 Publication Date Friday, 17 November 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Virtualization in 5G Networks
Submission Date: 2017-07-14

Research in wireless communications and networking is nowadays focused on the study and development of the next generation of cellular networks, the 5th Generation (5G). 5G is expected to provide an unprecedented step forward in terms of performance and service delivery, by merging the needs for massive wireless access with the requirements of Internet of Things and Tactile Internet scenarios. To achieve such goal, consensus is growing towards the need for an enhanced infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility and adaptability to service requirements. In this scenario, virtualization techniques represent a concrete solution for providing Quality of Service guarantees, service isolation, and real-time adaptation to service requirements. Indeed, even though 5G is currently under development, it is widely acknowledged that 5G systems will be based on a heterogeneous networking infrastructure, thus requiring network function virtualization (NFV) and software defined networking (SDN) paradigms to enable proper abstracting and management of a diverse pool of resources. The introduction of NFV and SDN technologies within next-generation heterogeneous mobile networks will define new virtual network elements, each impacting the logic of the network management and operation, enabling the creation of new generation services with significantly higher data rates and lower delays. Such advances will introduce novel challenges in terms of design, operation, management, and security. The purpose of this special issue is to present the most recent results on the specific research challenges related to virtualization in 5G networks. This includes all aspects related to the modeling, design, analysis, deployment, and management of virtualized 5G networks. The special issue will accept papers discussing recent outcomes in virtualization and programmability of wireless networks in general, efficient and flexible resource sharing, resource slicing in the wireless domain, and end-to-end, up to 5G standardization-specific aspects such as Cloud RAN architecture or network management and control. High quality research papers or comprehensive reviews of recent advances in virtualization in 5G are welcome. We invite original contributions from both academia and industry that are not yet published or that are not currently under review by other journals or peer-reviewed conferences. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Virtualization and programmability in wireless access networks Software-defined wireless networks Network function virtualization in the wireless domain Models and tools for design and optimization of virtualized cellular networks Models and technologies for wireless infrastructure sharing End-to-end 5G network slicing Mobile virtual wireless networks modeling and design Virtualized Radio Access Networks Cloud RAN Hybrid architectures of 5G with other wireless technologies (e.g., SDN/NFV satellite networks) Virtualization in 5G networks for Fog Computing applications Standards and resource description languages for virtual wireless networks Service composition from heterogeneous physical resources Network management and security in the virtualized domain Standardization on virtualized 5G infrastructure and modules Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/v5gn/. Manuscript Due Friday, 14 July 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 6 October 2017 Publication Date Friday, 1 December 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Road Safety and Traffic Efficiency in Smart Transportation: Systems, Protocols, and Applications
Submission Date: 2017-07-28

Currently, smart transportation has been spotlighted on advanced data services for the road safety and traffic efficiency. There are many environments composing the smart transportation, such as road networks, subway, parking areas, and bridges. Vehicles can play a vital role in monitoring these environments in the smart transportation to detect obstacles and hazards. The monitoring is performed by collection of various motion sensors (e.g., accelerometer, gyroscope, and magnetometer), obstacle detection sensors (e.g., ultrasonic and laser sensors), and camera (e.g., on-board camera and smartphone camera) in vehicles. In the smart transportation, precisely monitoring the surface on roads or subway rails and identifying the hazards are critically important, and the sensing can be performed by vehicles or subway trains as mobile sensors. Such sensing information can be shared among the vehicles or trains to avoid possible dangerous circumstances and situations. Additionally, it is important to support instantaneous response to dynamic transportation situations and neighboring vehicles or trains through the efficient and delay-bounded data communications, and this is possible through Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) (i.e., IEEE 802.11p) or Wi-Fi Direct. For the driving efficiency, sensors can measure a road congestion level for the navigation purpose. Also, vehicle sensors can share the current congestion level and the vehicles’ navigation paths with the Traffic Control Center (TCC) for the real-time coordination of the efficient navigation service. TCC performs global optimized road traffic control along with the synchronization of traffic signaling system and navigation system. In this special issue, the journal will focus on systems, protocols, and applications for the smart transportation related to the road safety and traffic efficiency. Original research articles as well as review articles, designs, implementation, experiments, and analysis for the systems, protocols, and applications for the smart transportation are welcome. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Sensing and identifying obstacles and hazards in smart transportation Collective sensing and intelligence in mobile sensor networks for smart transportation Measuring and estimating road traffic conditions Network layer protocols and transport layer protocols for smart transportation networks Vehicle-to-everything (V2X) communications for road safety Collision warning services in intersection and highways Pedestrian protection services in streets Cooperative platooning and adaptive cruise control in roadways Navigation and traffic signaling systems for smart transportation Multimodal transportations services for smart transportation Security and privacy services in smart transportation networks Protocol simulations, testbeds, and demonstrators for smart transportation Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/rstet/. Manuscript Due Friday, 28 July 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 20 October 2017 Publication Date Friday, 15 December 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on IoT Approaches for Distributed Computing
Submission Date: 2017-07-28

21.000 million devices will be connected to the Internet by 2021, and 16.000 of them will be part of the Internet of Things. The usage of manifold connected sensors (temperature, humidity, pressure, vibration, air quality, etc.) in different fields (plants, animals, geological phenomena, cities, homes, etc.) will enable the collection of a vast amount of data subsequently transformed into information and knowledge. However, such a knowledge creation process cannot be handled in a totally centralized way and must be combined with distributed computing so that information transmitted is reduced by sharing the processing load among devices. In traditional distributed computing, shared processing is enabled by additional hardware architectures that have to satisfy higher processing capabilities while ensuring lower power consumption. The distinct characteristics of IoT technologies require a more intricate trade-off communication versus computation. In particular, a large number of sensors and QoS strict requirements demand new distributed techniques. As the sensor volume grows, infrastructures for IoT distributed computing must include nodes close to the edge that facilitate data analysis for a cluster of sensors. They must also perform edge analytics to reduce the data sent to the core from high-frequency readings and decrease the bandwidth needed. Finally, they must guarantee that customer experience is not compromised, which requires new robust techniques with strict QoS and latency requirements. The emerging paradigm of fog computing enables us to meet these requirements by moving storage and compute services to the network edge or even to the end devices (e.g., to a data hub or to a smart access point). Consequently, IoT deployments require new abstraction or multiagent approaches to distribute tasks among edges and cloud; new techniques and communication standards for sharing information to increase spectrum efficiency while keeping data consistency and availability; and new meta-data, policies, and hardware/software capabilities to aid fog-orchestration in distributed databases. The aim of this special issue is to provide state-of-the-art solutions tackling the mentioned IoT distributed computing problems. High quality research papers as well as contributions from industry that are not yet published or under review are welcomed. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Distributed information fusion in IoT networks Distributed sensing and data gathering for IoT Computational complexity reduction approaches for IoT Load balancing among edge and cloud nodes for large IoT deployments Edge analytics for data and bandwidth reduction Multiagent systems for IoT distributed computing Hardware architectures for embedded distributed computing Energy harvesting for IoT distributed computing Battery efficient IoT devices New communications standards for sharing information and increasing spectrum efficiency Performance bounds for distributed computing Virtualization of edge devices Applications of IoT that combine edge and cloud resources Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/iota/. Manuscript Due Friday, 28 July 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 20 October 2017 Publication Date Friday, 15 December 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Dynamic Resource Sharing Techniques for 5G Wireless Networks
Submission Date: 2017-07-28

5G networks are expected to provide transmission speeds of Gigabits per second, with very low latencies, to up to a million connections per square kilometer. In order to achieve these objectives, network operators must redesign their networks and deploy new equipment. Nevertheless, operators can collaborate and take advantage of novel resource sharing techniques to achieve a more efficient use of available radio access and core network infrastructure, reducing both the capacity expenditure (CAPEX) and operation expenditure (OPEX) in the network deployment and operations. A classical layered approach to enable the resource sharing is to adopt a specific middleware. Multiple virtual wireless networks can coexist on the same physical radio and core infrastructure in order to increase efficiency while keeping guaranteed quality-of-experience (OoE) for end-users. Virtualization and software defined networks (SDNs) are another pillar of resource sharing to reduce costs in complex ecosystems interconnected with wireless technology. The different applications and resource allocation policies will also impact the performance of the physical (PHY) and medium access control (MAC) layers. The upper layers will influence the design of waveforms, modulation and coding schemes, frame structures, and control planes in the next generation of wireless network PHY and MAC layers. The purpose of this special issue is to provide readers with current advances in the technologies that will make possible to share resources among multiple operators or different traffic categories in 5G networks in a dynamic manner. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Shared wireless PHY and MAC Antenna sharing in Massive MIMO Resource sharing in heterogeneous wireless networks Cooperative multipoint in wireless communications Unlicensed spectrum resource sharing in LTE cell networks Cognitive radio for spectrum resource sharing Dynamic shared resources orchestration Machine learning and middleware techniques to predict and optimize resource sharing Novel mechanisms to guarantee the quality of service (QoS) in dynamic shared networks Software Defined Networks (SDN) and Network Function Virtualization (NFV) for Network Slicing and Operator Virtualization Security for sharing resources in wireless communications Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/rswn/. Manuscript Due Friday, 28 July 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 20 October 2017 Publication Date Friday, 15 December 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Recent Advances in Mobile Cloud Computing
Submission Date: 2017-07-28

Mobile devices like smartphones, laptops, tablets, computers, and so forth are upgraded day by day in the market and have also become an essential need for everyone. However, mobile devices face many resource and other challenges (battery life, storage, bandwidth, security, etc.). To solve these problems, researchers have introduced a trusted and dependable solution, called Mobile Cloud Computing (MCC), which refers to an infrastructure where both data storage and data processing happen outside the mobile device. Moreover, mobile cloud applications move the computing power and data storage away from the mobile devices and into powerful and centralized computing platforms located in clouds, which are then accessed over the wireless connection based on a thin native client. As in every new technology, some challenges face the vision of the Mobile Cloud Computing, which are the administrative policies and security concerns (i.e., secure data storage, secure computation, network security, data privacy, location privacy, etc.). This special issue aims to investigate the opportunities and requirements for Mobile Cloud Computing dominance. In addition, it seeks novel contributions that help mitigate Mobile Cloud Computing challenges. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Privacy-preserving protocols in Mobile Cloud Computing Access control mechanisms in Mobile Cloud Computing Cryptography cloud storage MCC pricing and billing models MCC support for VANETs and MANETs Lightweight authentication mechanisms in MCC architecture Access control models in MCC The future perspective for MCC: challenges and open issues MCC quality of service (QoS) improvements techniques Social engineering, insider threats, and advanced spear phishing Forensics of virtual and MCC environments Security protocols in MCC Mobile malware collection, statistics, and analysis Reverse engineering and automated analysis of mobile malware Benchmarking and evaluation of mobile security solutions Android device forensics Security and privacy in mobile operating systems Mobile system vulnerability detection and remediation Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/ramc/. Manuscript Due Friday, 28 July 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 20 October 2017 Publication Date Friday, 15 December 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Privacy in the Internet of Things
Submission Date: 2017-08-04

The ubiquity of sensor devices in Internet of Things opens up a large source for sensory data, which has shown great potential in benefiting the industry as well as improving people’s quality of life. Sensory data has become an indispensable component in wide variety of applications, including manufacturing, marketing, healthcare, transportation, entertainment, environmental monitoring, indoor localization, and traffic monitoring, and will continue to play an even more pivotal role in the near future. Smart sensors are being employed in more and more manufacturers. Thanks to sensory data, their efficiency has been substantially increased, product defects have been dramatically reduced, and customers' quality of experience has been improved to a maximum extend. It is worth mentioning that more than 40 percent of data generated from Internet of Things come from sensors. On the other hand, the size of sensory data has already overwhelmed the current ability to collect, store, and analyze them which is one of the major bottlenecks to the further development of IoT applications. More problematically, consumers’ privacy is being seriously threatened by the huge amount of sensory data revealing personal information. Unfortunately, conventional privacy protection methodologies are mainly for small scale or isomorphic data, and they are not effective or efficient for big sensory data. Therefore, corresponding privacy protection technologies and tools are eagerly expected so that people can enjoy the benefits of sensory data with privacy being preserved anytime and anywhere. This special issue solicits high-quality contributions that focus on designing new technologies and tools to address the privacy issues towards sensory data. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Privacy for sensory data applications and implementations Privacy for sensory data collection Privacy for sensory data fusion and transformation Privacy for sensory data storage management Privacy for sensory data sharing and visualization Privacy for sensory data access control Privacy for sensory data analytics and mining Privacy for mobile social networks Privacy for vehicular networks Privacy and service trade-off for mobile applications Business processing and business models for Pricing model for sensory data Signal processing in the encrypted domain Data anonymization Privacy versus information sharing trade-offs Privacy in wearable devices Privacy in smart home and smart city Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at https://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/pbsd/. Manuscript Due Friday, 4 August 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 27 October 2017 Publication Date Friday, 22 December 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Emerging Small Cell Wireless Technologies for 5G: Architectures and Applications
Submission Date: 2017-08-11

5th Generation (5G) is the next step of mobile telecommunication standards. It will offer new services with ultrahigh system capacity, ultralow latency, massive device connectivity, ultrahigh security, ultralow energy consumption, and extremely high quality of experience (QoE). Researchers all over the world are focusing on the development of 5G communication systems, aiming to be fully available for the users by 2020. This era of wireless communication will bring new exclusive network technologies and service capabilities. Small cell network technologies will be the key driver for the 5G communication. It is expected that 5G communication will consist of ultradense heterogeneous small cell networks. The use of the traditional radio frequency- (RF-) based wireless communication is being saturated to meet the demand of 5G. Hence, researchers are searching for new spectrum for wireless communication. The optical spectrum (infrared, visible light, and ultraviolet) is considered a promising solution for the development of future high density and high capacity optical wireless communication (OWC) networks. The OWC offers unique advantages such as huge unregulated bandwidth and inherent security. Therefore, the coexistence of RF based omnidirectional and OWC based directional small cells will be the excellent approach for the targeted multitier ultradense heterogeneous networks in 5G. This special issue calls for high-quality and unpublished research papers on recent advances mainly in emerging small cell wireless technologies that are expected to meet the requirement of the 5G communication systems. Contributions may present and solve open research problems, integrate novel solutions efficiently, focus on the performance evaluation, and compare with existing standards. Theoretical as well as experimental studies for typical and newly emerging small cell wireless technologies use cases enabled by recent advances in wireless networks are encouraged. High-quality review papers are also welcomed. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Optical wireless communication (OWC) Visible light communication (VLC) Optical camera communication (OCC) Light-fidelity (LiFi) RF small cell networks V2X communications Small cell based applications and services Coexistence of optical and RF based wireless technologies Traffic offloading in multitier heterogeneous networks Convergence of small cells with higher-tier networks Spectrum allocation and management Interference management for ultradense small cell networks Quality of service (QoS)/quality of experience (QoE) constraints Integration of emerging OWC standards with existing RF standards Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at https://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/ewt/. Manuscript Due Friday, 11 August 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 3 November 2017 Publication Date Friday, 29 December 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Resilient and Secure Mobile Systems and Networks
Submission Date: 2017-08-11

The improved level of sophistication and computing power of current mobile systems and networks allows the development of complex and always connected applications, like mobile ticketing and banking that are increasingly playing a key role in our everyday business and entertainment life. More importantly, several research proposals envision the use of mobile systems in critical scenarios, for example, unmanned smart mobility, large-scale mobile cloud computing systems, wireless control of robots and UAVs, ambient assisted living, mobile crowd-sensing, and inclusion of humans in the computation loop, remote surgery, and so forth. In these scenarios, a device freeze or a network failure, either accidental or malicious, could result in a major loss or hazard, such as an e-health application not being able to report a critical alert to the medical center on time. However, the increased level of sophistication makes these systems more and more vulnerable to accidental failures and security attacks. A first example of mobile malware, named Cabir and affecting Symbian OS devices, emerged in 2004. Since then, there has been a proliferation of worms, trojans, and malware affecting mobile systems, such as HummingBad which has recently infected over 10 million Android devices. A variety of research studies have been produced proposing methods, proof-of-concept prototypes, and disciplines to model, design, develop, verify, and maintain mobile systems and services. Despite these efforts, it is still unclear how the resiliency and security of mobile systems and networks are affected by the continuous increase in their complexity, and if current solutions are sufficient to increase resiliency and security levels. This is with respect to not just normal communications but also life-critical and business-critical activities where mobile systems are in increasing usage. The goal of this special issue is to put on the foreground all the above issues, by providing a consistent source of timely information and research advances in the area of resilient and secure mobile systems and networks, by identifying open research issues, discussing the limitations and/or advantages of existing solutions, and/or proposing original and innovative solutions in this challenging arena. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Design principles, models, and techniques for building resilient, secure mobile systems Formal and runtime verification of mobile cloud systems and services End-to-end approaches for the quality of experience (QoE) of mobile services Autonomous systems for resiliency and security Mobile middleware architectures and standards for heterogeneous, resilient ad-hoc, or infrastructure-based networks Architectures for resiliency and security monitoring in mobile systems Resiliency and security measurement studies of mobile systems and services Cellular networks and mobile phones resiliency and security issues Real-world applications and prototypes of resilient/or secure mobile systems Resilience of evolvable/adaptive mobile systems and services Model-driven engineering of resilient secure mobile systems Proposals for increasing security and resiliency of mobile systems, also considering usability and accessibility aspects Testing methodologies for assessing the resilience and security of mobile cloud services and applications Virtualization techniques for improving the resilience of mobile services Metrics analyzing the crowd in terms of security and behavioral profiles Metrics investigating how to measure the resiliency of mobile crowd sensing platforms Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at https://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/rsms/. Manuscript Due Friday, 11 August 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 3 November 2017 Publication Date Friday, 29 December 2017
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Networking Smart Robots
Submission Date: 2017-08-25

Recent developments of wireless technologies, autonomous computing, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanotechnology, in conjunction with extensive demands and investments in developing cooperative robotics and automation for new advanced manufacturing to enable new advancements in global scale production. As an extension to wireless sensor network (WSN) technologies in the robotic world we envisage a new networking paradigm of advanced interworking intelligent robots to rise under the concept of Networking Smart Robots. This momentum for this industrial opportunity started under “networked robotics” a quarter of a century ago. It promised enabling new research programs between productive academics and advanced industries for a unified front to push for the making of superior cooperative mobile robots, resulting in impacts into various aspects of technological developments including precision manufacturing (programmable, programmability, and dynamics aspects); advanced automated services and maintenance; better distributed surveillance and security; proactive discovery and cooperative explorations (space, underwater, deserts, and frozen lands); dynamic monitoring (new construction sites, mines, agricultural, toxic gas, and harsh environments); emergency rescue infrastructures and services for epidemics and disastrous incidents (fire, hospital, earthquake, and rescue missions). The main objective of this special issue is to publish high-quality research papers and review articles, addressing recent advances on smart sensing and networking issues of cooperative, autonomous robots. Original, high quality contributions that are not yet published or that are not currently under review for other journals or peer-reviewed conferences are sought. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Basic concepts, prospects, and trends in the future of networking mobile robots Pros and cons of networking aspects of clustered and distributed mobile robots Energy and scarce resource management aspects of networked mobile robots Trends and future of mobile robotics in interactive monitoring Networking topologies, modeling, and simulation of cooperative mobile robots Networking aspects of smart mobile robots—requirements and applications Protocol aspects of cooperative smart mobile robots—requirements and standards Overlaying and cross layer design aspects of cooperative smart mobile robots Design of remotely controlled intelligent mobile robotic systems Design tools for lightweight cooperative mobile robots Implementation of homogeneous WSNs for cooperative mobile robots Implementation of heterogeneous sensor systems for cooperative mobile robots Networking scenarios for lightweight robotic manufacturing New applications of advanced cooperative robotics in lightweight manufacturing Applications of robotic scenarios for cooperative surveillance Applications of cooperative mobile robots in harsh and extreme environments Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at https://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/nsr/. Manuscript Due Friday, 25 August 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 17 November 2017 Publication Date Friday, 12 January 2018
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Mobile Assistive Technologies
Submission Date: 2017-08-25

Over the past few years, assistive technologies have made important steps in enhancing the quality of everyday life, in terms of autonomy and well-being of individuals in need of assistance and care. Recent advances in information technology are leading to a rapid evolution of mobile platforms into standards for the implementation of assistive technologies. Mobile assistive technologies allow individuals to benefit from portable and discrete aids delivered through ubiquitous devices. Ranging from physical assistive aids to domotics or even applications that repurpose smartphones to electronic assistive devices, breakthrough technologies are allowing to accomplish everyday tasks or even engage in learning tasks and develop social skills more easily. This special issue aims at creating a multidisciplinary forum of discussion on recent advances within the field of mobile technology to support individuals of all ages in need of assistance and care. The special issue will be expected to show a diversity of new developments in these areas. Submissions containing high-quality original research results as well as review articles of the field. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Accessibility of mobile platforms Assistive IoT architectures, protocols, and algorithms in smart cities Augmented and virtual reality mediated assistive applications Cloud-based assistive technologies Collaborative design of mobile assistive applications Gamification in mobile assistive technologies Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and usability in mobile assistive technology Integrated mobile solutions for Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) Mobile affective computing Mobile assistive technology architecture and design Mobile entertainment technologies for the elderly Mobile rehabilitation technologies Mobile telehealth and telemedicine Networked multimodal platforms Personal virtual coaches for assisted living Sensory feedback and biofeedback systems in assistive technologies Social-cognitive models of assistive technologies Trust, security, and privacy issues in mobile assistive technologies Wearable assistive technologies and Internet of Things (WIoT) Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at https://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/mat/. Manuscript Due Friday, 25 August 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 17 November 2017 Publication Date Friday, 12 January 2018
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Advances in V2X Communication and Networks
Submission Date: 2017-08-25

Vehicle-to-everything (V2X) communication is passing of information from a vehicle to any entity such as vehicle to vehicle (V2V), pedestrians (V2P), roadway infrastructure (V2I), home (V2H), network (V2N), and bicycle (V2B). Reliable vehicular connectivity has a significant importance in the contemporary connected and mobile world. V2X networks can significantly improve efficiency, decrease traffic incidents, improve safety, and mitigate the congestion impact. The last decade has witnessed significant growth and tremendous advances in V2V and V2I networking and communication system. However, to realize the full potential of vehicular communication, massive challenges need to be addressed and significant efforts need to be made in security, congestion control, low latency connectivity, cooperative driving, scalability, dependability, and opportunistic channel access. V2X networks should accommodate high degree of heterogeneity in terms of hardware, software, wireless technology, and applications. Topology control and deployment are comparatively more complex in heterogeneous wireless networks. The main challenge for future V2X networks is how to cope with very complex systems, ever-increasing heterogeneity, and a huge number of devices contending for limited wireless resources. To address these challenges, there is an urgent need of more intelligent devices and algorithms that lead to more interoperable solutions and can make autonomous decisions on optimal operation modes and configurations. This special issue is mainly focused on innovative and validated solutions for improving the deployment and operation of heterogeneous V2X networks. The objective of this issue is to explore recent advances and challenges in the area of V2V, V2P, V2I, V2H, V2N, and V2B wireless communication and future direction with respect to radio technologies, V2X network systems, and applications. More specifically, it is expected that the contribution of original works proposes new directions in emerging V2X networks. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: V2X networks for autonomous and cooperative driving 5G and hybrid 5G/802.11p technologies for V2X networks Heterogeneous networking approaches (multiradio and multiapplication) MAC and routing protocols for V2X networks Mobility management for V2X networks Mobility models in V2X Architectures, algorithms, and protocols for data dissemination, processing, and aggregation in V2X networks PHY and radio channel models for V2X networks Simulation and performance evaluation for V2X networks Results from experimental systems, testbeds, and pilot studies Impact assessments of vehicular networks on safety, transportation efficiency, and the environment Communications related to electric and hybrid vehicles Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at https://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/avcn/. Manuscript Due Friday, 25 August 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 17 November 2017 Publication Date Friday, 12 January 2018
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Wireless Networking Technologies for Smart Cities
Submission Date: 2017-09-01

Smart cities are becoming reality, due to the enormous research into the technology enablers and development of the Internet of Things (IoT) enabling a multitude of applications, which are built around various types of sensors. To manage the increased population of cities, there is a need to have more sustainable, environmentally-, and economically-friendly smarter cities and technologies. Recently, a number of smart devices appeared on a large scale, such as the SleepNumber smart bed with its focus on health during sleeping, the Kolibree smart toothbrush, and the Belkin smart saucepan. These are the few, with more applications and products to be showcased in the recent future. In the context of this special issue, we define a smart city as a collection of entities (living and nonliving) in an urban area that is always connected, fully aware, automanaged, self-secure, adaptive, and well-informed. Furthermore, the growing footprint of ultra-high-speed broadband networks, pervasive wireless networks, cloud computing, crowd sensing, and software-defined infrastructure connect smart/mobile devices to generate relevant city data on a massive scale. These advances will enable transformative applications and services that will enhance the quality of peoples’ lives while addressing important national priorities such as real-time tracking, security, authenticity, and availability of classified information to the decision makers. Similarly, to make a smart city, a strong communications infrastructure is required for connecting smart objects, people, and sensors. For instance, audio and video sensors support a variety of safety (monitoring) and nonsafety applications. Communication within cities involves multiple aggregations and access networks that can be either public or private. A city may gather data from smart devices and sensors embedded in the roadways, power grids, buildings, and other assets. It shares that data via a smart communications system that is typically a combination of wired and wireless networks. It then uses smart software to create valuable information and digitally enhanced services such as health care assistance, security and safety, real-time traffic monitoring, and managing the environment. In this special issue, we aim to bring together researchers, academics, and individuals working on selected areas of smart cities along with new emerging technologies and share their new ideas, latest findings, and results. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Resource and network management in smart cities Wireless Networking for crowd sensing applications in smart cities Quality of Service (QoS) mechanisms for wireless networks in smart cities Integration and coexistence of technologies and networks for smart cities Mobile Traffic analytics for smart cities applications Interoperability between heterogeneous networks of smart cities Smart applications for smart cities Communication architectures for audio and video sensors in smart cities Energy-aware wireless protocols and algorithms for smart cities Sensing technologies and applications for smart cities Wireless networks for smart city surveillance and management Experimental network measurements and characterization of smart cities data traffic Cooperative and smart sensing techniques Sensor deployment, placement, and control and management issues Experimental results, prototypes, and testbeds for smart cities Security issues and solutions for privacy in smart cities Role of intelligent transportation in smart cities Big data analytics for smart networks Cognitive networks and IoT for smart cities Smart recovery of incomplete or missing data in IoT for smart cities Mobile edge computing (or fog computing) in smart networks Smart grid in wireless smart cities Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) for smart cities Future internet architectures and smart cities Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/wntsc/. Manuscript Due Friday, 1 September 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 24 November 2017 Publication Date Friday, 19 January 2018
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Green Computing and Communications for Smart Portable Devices
Submission Date: 2017-09-01

Smart portable devices have been playing a crucial role in the long-term evolutionary (LTE) communications and are expected to be an indispensable part of the 5G system. While smart portable devices (e.g., smartphone and tablets) have powerful computing and communication capabilities, the high data rate services, however, drain out the energy of the device much faster than before. A mobile user, for example, can watch a video on a smartphone, be served an ad for an interesting item, and tap through to the site to purchase it on the phone. However, the current phone battery is not durable to support all these activities in one day. Even worse, if a user typically transmits/shares large volumes of data for a long time, it will shorten the lifetime of the device significantly and deplete the batteries rapidly. As a result, cost-effective and energy-efficient computing and communication mechanism for smart portable devices are required to be designed and developed. With the goal of reduction of energy consumption, green computing and communication refer to the solutions that are able to improve the network’s performances in terms of computing/energy efficiency, data privacy, and network security. This special issue intends to bring together the leading researchers and developers from both academia and industry to discuss and present their views on all the aspects of green computing and communications for smart portable devices. All submissions should neither have been published previously nor be currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. The submitted papers will undergo a strict peer review based on originality, quality, and relevance to this special issue and the journal. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Energy-efficient techniques for 5G wireless communication systems Green smart devices for Internet of Things Energy harvesting, storage, and recycling Energy efficiency in big data networking Low cost, energy-efficient antenna and RF designs Green network monitoring and measurements Green communications under delay or quality of service constraints Theory, modeling, analysis, and/or optimization for green and sustainable communications and systems Self-organizing green wireless networks Advanced metering infrastructure and smart meter technologies Economy and pricing for green communication and services Context-based green management and green awareness Experimental test-beds and results for green communications Green technologies for intelligent transport systems Cross-layer design and optimization for green communications and networking Green optical communications, switching, and networking Physical layer approaches for green communications Green techniques for smart highways and vehicular networks Signal processing for green communications Sustainable communication platforms Standardization, policy, and regulation for green communications and computing Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at https://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/gren/. Manuscript Due Friday, 1 September 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 24 November 2017 Publication Date Friday, 19 January 2018
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Crowdsourcing for Mobile Networks and IoT
Submission Date: 2017-09-08

As the deep integration of ubiquitous sensors, intelligent devices, and social networks, mobile networks and IoT are formed by the opportunity of virtual mobile communication networks and social communities between mobile carriers. People involved in a mobile network can easily interact and share information with each other anytime and anywhere though the popular use of intelligent devices. As a result, there is a remarkable trend to enable crowdsourcing for mobile networks and IoT to address various problems that involve real-time collection, processing, and collaborations among participants in highly mobile environments. Thus, crowdsourcing could be an efficient strategy to improve quality and user experiences of applications in mobile networks and IoT, which not only potentially brings enormous benefits for economics but also leads to revolution for our daily life. Particularly, mobile crowdsensing takes advantage of the mobile terminal’s mobility and provides context-aware services in large scale areas. The embedded sensors including accelerometer, compass, gyroscope, GPS, microphone, and camera in mobile phones are leveraged to gather the required information to support location-based services, for example, environmental measurements, personal activity sharing, and online recommendation. Currently, a number of crowdsourcing based mobile applications have been applied in mobile networks and IoT, targeting at real time services and recommendation, for example, Uber, Elance, Amazon, and Airbnb. However, mobile crowdsourcing may face some limitations caused by the mobile devices, such as computation, memory, and energy constraints. Besides, most of them focus on the application functionalities, ignoring the users’ willingness and operationality. Therefore, feasible and efficient crowdsourcing schemes are desirable for the applications of mobile networks and IoT, such as suitable incentive scheme, appropriate task assignment, and user-friendly mobile applications. The objective of this special issue is to collect articles on the state of the art and practices of crowdsourcing for mobile networks and IoT. In particular, we are soliciting theoretical and applied research in crowdsourcing solutions for mobile networks and IoT including algorithms, modeling, technologies, and applications. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Architecture, strategies, and/or algorithms for IoT based crowdsensing Protocols, scheduling, and/or designs for crowdsensing mobile networking Privacy and security for crowdsourcing schemes in mobile networks and IoT Data source reliability estimation and assurance for crowdsourcing in IoT Incentive schemes for motivating users to participate in crowdsourcing applications Crowdsourced image/video processing and retrieval in mobile networks and IoT Crowdsourcing in secure IoT Plausible and user-friendly software design and implementation for crowdsourcing application Standards, policy, and regulation for V2X communication systems using crowdsourcing schemes Trust establishment and measurement for crowdsensing based IoT Task assignment and resource management in crowdsensing based IoT Novel crowdsensing applications of Internet robots and intelligent devices in IoT Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at https://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/icmn/. Manuscript Due Friday, 8 September 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 1 December 2017 Publication Date Friday, 26 January 2018
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
Special Issue on Channel Modeling and Simulation for Vehicular Communications
Submission Date: 2017-09-29

The interest that exists globally around the so-called intelligent transportation systems (ITS) has fostered a large amount of research activities aimed at developing new wireless communication technologies for the information exchange among vehicles on the move. The design of such technology gained an important momentum when in 1999 the American Federal Communications Commission (FCC) allocated a 75 MHz bandwidth in the 5.9 GHz band for dedicated short-range communication (DSRC) systems. While the predominant technology for vehicular communications is based on radiofrequency, an alternative that is receiving increasing attention leans toward the use of visible light communication (VLC) technology. Furthermore, the solutions based on VLC technology can easily be extrapolated to underwater vehicular communications. While the future ahead looks promising, the design of radio and optical transceivers for vehicular communications is not a trivial task, because the high speed at which the vehicles can move poses several new challenges that are not a concern for conventional mobile communication systems. For example, due to the rapidly changing propagation conditions that are typically found in vehicular communication environments, the Doppler shift effects and the nonstationary characteristics of the wireless channel become exacerbated. These issues can significantly affect the performance of transceivers that are not optimized to operate over highly time-varying channels. Proper channel models are therefore needed that provide insights into the physics of vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) radio/optical reception and at the same time that lend themselves to mathematical and numerical system performance investigations. In response to such a need, this special issue aims to serve as a forum for the identification of problems and research trends, the dissemination of novel results and ideas, and the discussion of hot topics in the area of channel modeling and simulation for vehicular communication systems. Prospective authors are welcome to submit original and high-quality papers in any of the topics of this special issue. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Channel modeling and simulation for IEEE 802.11p and LTE-V vehicular communication systems Channel modeling and simulation for vehicular communication systems based on VLC technology (e.g., systems based on applications of the IEEE 802.15.7 standard) Modeling and simulation of highly time-varying channels for railroad communications Modeling and simulation of nonstationary multipath fading channels Channel modeling and simulation for underwater vehicular communications Measurement-based channel modeling and novel sounding techniques for vehicular communications Hardware emulators for V2V and V2I channels Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at https://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/wcmc/cmsvc/. Manuscript Due Friday, 29 September 2017 First Round of Reviews Friday, 22 December 2017 Publication Date Friday, 16 February 2018
Last updated by Dou Sun in 2017-04-30
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